Posted on Leave a comment

Whatever The Verdict Might Be …

Five days ago, the world watched as Derek Chauvin, a police officer from Minneapolis, MN, was convicted on all three charges in the murder of George Floyd. The murder drew worldwide attention when it first occurred almost a year ago, and most people waited anxiously to see what would be the outcome.

Many unarmed black men in America had been murdered by police in the years prior and even following George Floyd’s murder. Some of them never faced trial, far less conviction, therefore this verdict rendered last week brought a sense of relief to many, especially George’s family.

The Rev. Al Sharpton, civil rights activist and news commentator, said in an interview following the verdict that George’s family had requested that he pray with them following the verdict, whatever it might be. They said they wanted to thank God, whether the verdict was good or bad, for bringing them through their painful ordeal.

In this time of uncertainty when we are grappling with sickness, loss of earnings, and the fear of what tomorrow might bring, we would do well to take a lesson from the Floyd family. These people, who watched the video over and over of a man kneeling on the neck of their loved one until his life was snuffed out, and still wanted to thank God for bringing them through, deserve our respect and admiration.

Researchers tell us that being thankful can reduce depression and stress, boost our immune system, help us sleep better and improve our overall mental and physical health. It can be easy to slip into an attitude of bitterness and despair when things are going against us, but a thankful attitude can help us overcome many of the obstacles that block our path.

Have you been dealing with type 2 diabetes or some other condition for a long time and wondering if or when you would get over it? Do you feel hopeless at times? Take a leaf out of the Floyd family playbook. Thank God for bringing you thus far. Thank Him for all He’s doing for you now and for what He’ll do for you in the future, then watch Him work in your life.

If you enjoyed this post and would like to receive more like this, please fill in the form below. Your name will be added to my mailing list and you will be kept up to date on special offers.

Posted on Leave a comment

Lifestyle Choices Are Key For Managing Type 2 Diabetes

Newsletter signup

Please sign up to receive more posts like this in your inbox.

Please wait...

Thank you for sign up!

Posted on Leave a comment

Walking: Your Pathway To Happiness

If you’ve been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, your doctor may have told you that one of the best ways to cope with the disease is to increase your physical activity. But you may be thinking you don’t have the energy or you don’t feel well enough to exercise. Well, I have just the solution for you: Walking.

Sedentary workers

Walking is one of the easiest ways to incorporate more physical activity into your lifestyle. Let’s face it: the average person spends more time sitting than moving or standing. If you are a sedentary worker, you most likely spend almost eight hours at your desk. And when you leave work, you drive or ride in a bus or train for another 30 minutes, then when you get home, you eat, shower and lie in front of the television. The next day you rinse and repeat.

Sitting too much is bad for you

Studies have found that sitting for such long periods accounts for illnesses such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes and cancer. You can counteract these outcomes by walking at least 20 minutes during your lunch break, taking the stairs at some time during the day and maybe walking your dog (if you have one) or engaging in some sport or enjoyable activity when you get home.

The importance of physical activity

In terms of numbers, people who spend time sitting for about 8 hours a day but are otherwise physically active have a much lower risk of death when compared to others  who sat for a shorter duration but were not necessarily physically active. This should drive home the importance of physical activity, no matter how many hours a day an individual sits.

Benefits of walking

Walking burns calories –which helps you lose weight– controls glucose levels, lowers blood pressure, promotes better sleep and makes you feel better overall. According to the American College of Sport Medicine, if you are a 175-pound male, a leisurely 30-minute walk around the block will burn 146 calories. A 135-pound female, walking the same distance at the same speed, will burn 113 calories. For a brisk walk (4mph) the man will burn 167 calories, the woman 129 calories. Walking is easy on your joints, you don’t need special equipment to do it and you can walk at any time that is convenient to you.

If you are convinced, that walking can help you control your diabetes, heart disease or other ailment, why not decide now to begin a walking routine? One way to do that is to record it in your journal. Write when you plan to start, what time you will walk and for how long. Then do it!

If you enjoyed this blog post, please share it with your friends and sign up in the form below. Your name will be added to my mailing list and you will receive other offers and updates.

Posted on Leave a comment

Changing Your Mentality About Weight Loss

If you are diabetic and overweight, you are probably trying to lose weight in order to control your diabetes. However your mentality about weight loss will determine whether you succeed or fail in your efforts . If you have negative feelings about eating healthier or moving your body, then it’s going to be really hard to follow a weight loss plan. Then it feels like a chore that you are forcing yourself into, not something you want to do. When we are talking about mentality, it isn’t just about food but also about weight loss and your body.

Accept Your Body as it is

This can be the hardest part about changing how you think about weight loss and health, but it is also the most important. Most people who approach health from a weight loss perspective want to change their body. But if you can accept your body as it is right now and understand you don’t always have control over it, then you can actually have more success with natural weight loss. It seems counterintuitive, but if you come to a place where you accept your body, you won’t worry and obsess so much about changing it. It will still change if you continue on this journey, but you won’t stress yourself about it as much along the way.

Realize Weight Loss Won’t Make You Happier

If you ask anyone who has reached their weight loss goal, they will tell you this. Yes, you gain more confidence and boost your self-esteem, but it doesn’t actually make you a happier person or solve the issues you had before.

It isn’t going to heal your toxic relationship with food, change your attitude about your body, or cure your depression. These issues will still exist after the weight comes off. Understanding this can help you focus on changing your life as a whole, not just addressing your weight.

Focus on Health, Nutrition and Balance

Your mentality also has to do with how you approach health and what place nutrition and exercise have in your life. Balance out your healthy lifestyle changes while still enjoying your life. Moderate exercise that is good for your health and makes you stronger will do so much more for your mentality than sticking to a rigid, extreme workout schedule where you have to get up at 3.00 in the morning just to fit it into your day.

Understand What You Really Want

Really start practicing mindfulness to figure out what it is you want and what you hope to gain from weight loss. Keep writing in your journal about your struggles, why you want to lose weight, why you want to be healthier, and what benefits you are looking forward to.

Posted on Leave a comment

Hip Fracture Risk For Those With Diabetes

This article that came into my inbox was a very disturbing one for me. In a previous post, I told you about my husband falling in a parking lot and breaking his hip. Did I also tell you he is a type 2 diabetic? So, when I read the article about a study that stated, “diabetes was associated with a higher risk of hip and non-vertebral fractures,” it grabbed my attention.

Although the study found that those with type 1 diabetes were at greater risk for hip fractures than those with type 2, this was of little consolation to me. The article also stated that those under 65 with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes had “a higher risk for hip fracture, as did type 2 diabetes patients treated with insulin and with longer disease duration.” See why it’s not consoling? Those findings, revealed during Diabetes Awareness Week, convey to me that every person with diabetes is at danger of fracturing his/her hip if he/she falls.

Lead researcher Dr Tatiane Vilaca, from the University of Sheffield’s Mellanby Centre for Bone Research, said: “Diabetes can cause a number of well-known complications including kidney problems, loss of eyesight, problems with your feet and nerve damage. However, until now many people with diabetes and their doctors are unaware that they are also at greater risk of bone fractures.” That is so true. Now, in addition to being mindful about the problems mentioned above, you have to be careful that you don’t fall and break your hip.

So, how can you avoid the latter from happening? As an occupational therapist and health coach, I am well versed in fall prevention strategies, which we teach our patients, especially the elderly. If you are a young person, you are more likely to have stronger muscles and proper balance, however, you would do well to be aware of some of the steps you can take to prevent yourself from falling and suffering the consequences.

Here are some things you can do:

  • Exercising at least 30 minutes five times a week will strengthen and tone your muscles, helping to support your frame. You should also incorporate some weight-training aimed at strengthening your legs. If you are elderly, tai chi movements can be effective in improving your balance.
  • Watch your meds! Sleep aids, benzodiazepines, cough and cold drowsy formulas can upset your balance. Be sure to follow the instructions on the label and do not walk if you are sleepy.
  • Remove the clutter. Watch out for rugs, extension cords, and other objects in your path. Even your pet can be a fall hazard.
  • Light your path. If you are coming in late at night, make sure your pathway is well lit and there are no objects-like a water hose- waiting to trip you. The same goes for indoors. As a diabetic, you may have to get up during the night to go the bathroom. Make sure you have sufficient night lights to see by.
  • Wear proper footwear. High heels, slip-on sandals, are often the cause of many falls. Dr. Lewis Lipsitz, a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School says, “Fashion needs to take a back seat to function.” Another doctor said all shoes should have a back and a sole with good tread.
  • Discard your pride. Someone once told me she would never use a cane, even when her doctor recommended it. Using a cane or walker can save you from falling, which may even save your life. According to Dr. Lipsitz, “falls kill.” Which would you rather have, your pride or your life?

Type 2 diabetes is such a serious disease. You have to be careful about so many things. You can live a healthy and worry-free life, free of diabetes, if you get the help you need. Just fill in the form below and be on your way to a healthy and happy life.

Posted on Leave a comment

Monday Motivation – Can We Be Patient?

As the coronavirus pandemic drags on in the US and around the world, many are asking themselves, “how long?” How long again until we can go to the supermarket and not feel like we’re being stalked by some unseen creature about to pounce on us? How long before we can stop wiping down everything that enters our home? How long before the toilet paper we’re accustomed to reappears on the shelves? How long?

From what the experts tell us, getting rid of COVID-19 will not be a sprint, but more like a marathon. Yet, as I write this, some states are preparing to “open up” and have people return to work. Georgia’s governor gave the go-ahead to certain close-contact businesses, like hair and nail salons, to re-open on Friday, and on Monday, restaurants and movie theaters will follow suit.

Type 2 diabetics and people with underlying conditions are at great risk for contracting COVD-19. You are doing great so far. You are washing your hands, disinfecting everything, wearing your mask, and keeping your distance when you go out. Can you be patient a little longer? If you are a type 2 diabetic, I am appealing to you to stay at home as long as possible. I know some people have to work and unemployment checks are not coming in as fast as they should, but if you don’t fall into either of these two categories, please stay at home.

If you are among the fortunate few who don’t have to go out to work, try to conduct most of your business from home. Do you have a computer or smartphone? Enroll in online banking. Shop online and have your groceries delivered to your door. Stores are honoring the local distancing order so you don’t even have to see their delivery people. With all that extra time you have on your hands, you can wash your hair, give yourself a mani and pedi and soak in the tub. Do whatever you have to in order to make this time as stress-free as possible.

Many businesses –banks, utilities, auto insurance companies — and others are suspending late payment fees and cancellations on account of the coronavirus. But you must call them and make that arrangement. All is not lost. We may be under a great deal of stress right now; we don’t know how or when all of this is going to end, but there is Someone who knows.

Weeping may endure for a night, but joy comes in the morning. – Psalm 30: 5

And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to his purpose – Romans 8: 28

Be joyful in hope, patient in affliction, faithful in prayer – Romans 12: 12

Take heart, dear friends. This too will pass. Drop me a line and let me know how you are taking care of yourself during this trying time. And if you haven’t done so yet, please sign up for my Facebook group.

Posted on Leave a comment

Overcoming Guilt

When my children were little, I could usually tell when they were guilty of some mischief just by looking at their faces. Sometimes they might try to lie their way out of the situation, but their facial expressions usually gave them away. Now that they are older they know they no longer have reason to try to hide from me. If they made a mistake, they would tell me about it before I even found out.

How about you? Do you feel guilty because of some misdeed you have done? Or maybe it’s not a misdeed; you simply did something you should not have done, or you did not do something you should have done. Either way, you feel guilty. In the Bible, there were two people, Adam and his wife Eve, who did something they should not have done. They ate of the fruit God told them not to eat. And they got into trouble with God. (Read Genesis 3: 6) Sounds familiar?

The couple must have felt guilty for their wrongdoing because just like children, they went and hid themselves. But what did God do? Like a good father, He punished them for their misdeed, but He also showed them He still loved them by covering up their nakedness and their shame. (v 21)

We all have times when we feel guilty about something, small or big. When it comes to our health, we may feel guilty that we’re not doing enough. We are not eating the right foods, we are not as physically active as we would like to be, or we are not following our doctor’s orders. If you fall into of these categories, don’t lose hope. You can join my Type 2 Diabetics Network Facebook group where you will meet individuals like yourself who have the same struggles like you do.

We would also discuss what is important to you. Where do you feel you fall short? How can we help you cope with your illness without feeling either guilty or helpless? And much more. So, will you take a couple minutes and answer the following:

Where are you in your wellness journey? Do you recognize what the problem is? Have you found any solutions? Are you looking for solutions? Until next time, here’s to a healthy and happy lifestyle.

Posted on Leave a comment

Diabetic Meal Plan For The Holidays

In my last post, I wrote about the types of diabetes, how it affects your health and what you can do to prevent diabetes. With the holidays approaching, you may be wondering what you can eat without sabotaging your health. Here are some more tips to help you plan for the holidays:

  1. Eat a balanced diet. Some diabetics think that by eliminating all carbohydrates from their diet, they can control their diabetes, but this is not true. Carbs are your body’s main source of energy. The American Diabetes Association recommends that diabetics eat whole-grain foods since these are made of fiber which provide energy without affecting glucose levels. Stay away from white rice and flour.
  2. Use The Diabetes Plate Method to help you plan your meals so that you have a balanced meal in the right proportions. How does it work? You simply divide your plate in three sections. Fill half of it with non-starchy foods such as broccoli, kale, asparagus, whatever you choose. A quarter will be filled with whole grain or starchy foods, such as brown rice, whole wheat pasta or red potatoes. In the remaining quarter you will put your lean meat, fish or meat substitute.
  3. Limit sugary drinks. Your best drink is, of course, water, but you may have orange juice, lemonade, apple cider or even chai latte as long as they are sweetened with a no-sugar substitute. Whiskey and other alcoholic drinks such a vodka, gin and rum do not contain carbs and therefore should not affect your glucose levels. However, whiskey does have a tendency to drop your sugar level, so you may need to watch that. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) cautions that you should not drink on an empty stomach (to avoid hypoglycemia) and have no more than one or two drinks a day. Also, keep an eye on the sugar content of any mixer you put in your drink.
  4. Eat healthy snacks to stave off hunger. Diabetics can choose from a wide of variety of healthy snacks. Just make sure they are high in fiber, protein and healthy fats. Hard-boiled eggs top the list according to Healthline. They are rich in protein, keep you feeling full longer and do not raise your blood sugar after you eat. Other good snacks are unsweetened yogurt with berries, almonds, avocado, apples with peanut butter, roasted chickpeas, and popcorn among others.
  5. Eat dark-colored fruits. Blueberries, blackberries, dark cherries, and kiwi are some of the best fruits for diabetics. They are low-glycemic, meaning they don’t cause your glucose to spike, and they contain anti-inflammatory antioxidants.

As you can see you can enjoy your food without going hungry when you are a diabetic. Just be careful to choose foods that are nutritious, high in fiber and are healthy overall. Stay away from puddings and other rich desserts and you will have a happy and healthy holiday season.

Posted on November 30, 2019 by aquildon@yahoo.com — Leave a comment

Storing Those Thanksgiving Leftovers

ShareTweet

Image by PublicDomainPictures from Pixabay

I hope you had a wonderful Thanksgiving with the turkey and all the trimmings, and you were surrounded by all your loved ones. Life doesn’t get any better, does it? Now that Thanksgiving is over, you are left with the leftovers you will tire of in the next couple days. What can you do with them? Your freezer comes to the rescue.

Before you begin shoving the remains of that bird into your freezer, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) has some advice, and some guidelines, for you.

  • In order to prevent the growth of bacteria which can cause food poisoning, the CDC recommends that you put leftovers away quickly. How quickly? No longer than two hours after eating.
  • Refrigerate leftovers at 40 degrees F or colder.
  • Cut up the turkey or that pot roast into small pieces, no more than 2 inches thick. This will help them freeze more quickly and maintain quality. Store in small, airtight containers.
  • Use up leftovers within 3 to 4 days. Any remaining after that should be frozen. They can last for 3 – 4 months.
  • Use a permanent marker to label containers with the expiration date.

A guide to storing leftovers:

Food Fridge Freezer

Turkey 3 – 4 days 2 – 3 months

Meat (beef, ham) 3 – 4 days 2- 3 months

Chicken 3 – 4 days 2 – 6 months

Cranberry sauce can be frozen for up to 2 months, gravy 2 – 4 months and mashed potatoes, if made with butter and cream, can be frozen up to 1 year.

The holidays are not the only times you should plan your meals. You can plan and cook several meals ahead of time and freeze them. This will ensure you stay on track and save you time and money. If you would like to learn more about freezer cooking, just click on the FREE offer below. Your name will be added to my mailing list so you can receive more updates on offers like this. I will never share your information with anyone, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Free guide to Freezer Cooking

Posted on November 30, 2019 by aquildon@yahoo.com — Leave a comment

Storing Those Thanksgiving Leftovers

ShareTweet

Image by PublicDomainPictures from Pixabay

I hope you had a wonderful Thanksgiving with the turkey and all the trimmings, and you were surrounded by all your loved ones. Life doesn’t get any better, does it? Now that Thanksgiving is over, you are left with the leftovers you will tire of in the next couple days. What can you do with them? Your freezer comes to the rescue.

Before you begin shoving the remains of that bird into your freezer, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) has some advice, and some guidelines, for you.

  • In order to prevent the growth of bacteria which can cause food poisoning, the CDC recommends that you put leftovers away quickly. How quickly? No longer than two hours after eating.
  • Refrigerate leftovers at 40 degrees F or colder.
  • Cut up the turkey or that pot roast into small pieces, no more than 2 inches thick. This will help them freeze more quickly and maintain quality. Store in small, airtight containers.
  • Use up leftovers within 3 to 4 days. Any remaining after that should be frozen. They can last for 3 – 4 months.
  • Use a permanent marker to label containers with the expiration date.

A guide to storing leftovers:

Food Fridge Freezer

Turkey 3 – 4 days 2 – 3 months

Meat (beef, ham) 3 – 4 days 2- 3 months

Chicken 3 – 4 days 2 – 6 months

Cranberry sauce can be frozen for up to 2 months, gravy 2 – 4 months and mashed potatoes, if made with butter and cream, can be frozen up to 1 year.

The holidays are not the only times you need to plan your meals. To help you stay on track with your diet, you can plan and cook several meals and store them in your freezer. This will save you time and money. If you would like to learn more about freezer cooking, just click on the FREE offer below. Your name will be added to my mailing list so you can receive more updates on offers like this. I will never share your information with anyone, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Free guide to Freezer Cooking

Posted on Leave a comment

This Is American Diabetes Month

Walking is a great form of exercise

Did you know that November is Diabetes Awareness Month? It is a time set aside in the United States to bring awareness to this very common disease and to educate the public on what we can do to help ourselves and/or our loved ones deal with it. Diabetes is a devastating illness, but the good news is, it is controllable.

Diabetes is a disease in which blood sugar (glucose) levels in your body are too high. About 15 million women in the United States have diabetes, or about 1 in every 9 adult women. I am a health coach who helps men and women who struggle with uncontrolled diabetes cope with the illness so they can get off medication and lead a normal life. For the remainder of this month I will be focusing on causes, risk factors, how diabetes affects your overall health, how it affects men versus women, and how you can cope with this illness.

So first, let us look at the different types of diabetes. The three main types of diabetes are:

  • Type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, meaning the body’s immune (defense) system attacks and destroys the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. If you have type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin, so you must take insulin every day.
  • Type 2 diabetes. This is the most common type of diabetes. You can get type 2 diabetes at any age, even during childhood. With type 2 diabetes, your body does not make enough insulin or is not able to use its own insulin correctly. When this happens, blood glucose levels rise.
  • Gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that happens only during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes can cause health problems for the baby and the mother if not controlled. Although gestational diabetes goes away after your baby is born, having diabetes during pregnancy raises your risk for type 2 diabetes later on.

What is diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease caused by high levels of blood sugar (glucose) in your body. This can happen when your body does not make insulin or does not use insulin correctly.

Insulin is a hormone made in the pancreas, an organ near your stomach. Insulin helps the glucose from food get into your body’s cells for energy. If your body does not make enough insulin, or your body does not use the insulin correctly, the glucose stays and builds up in your blood.

Over time, this extra glucose can lead to prediabetes or diabetes. Diabetes puts you at risk for other serious and life-threatening health problems, such as heart disease, stroke, blindness, and kidney damage.

One of the ways you can fight diabetes is by incorporating more physical activity into your daily routine. Take the simple quiz on the right and see how you can do this then drop me a line and let me know how you are doing. If you are interested in learning more about diabetes or know someone who can benefit from this article, please share it with them and sign up for my newsletter where you can get more information and updates.

American Diabetes Month