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Mental vs Behavioral Health

May is mental health month, and as I thought about what I should write in this post, I felt confused. Well, it is mental health month after all, but for someone who worked in a mental (behavioral) health unit for over ten years I should have no difficulty discerning between the two. And yet, when I think of mental vs behavioral health, I see the faces of some of my patients – some alert, others flat, still others inappropriately animated. Many of them have coexisting conditions, either substance abuse disorders and/or chronic illnesses such as diabetes or high blood pressure. How do you address these problems?

MentalHealth.gov states that “mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being.” It goes on to state that mental illness affects your thinking, mood and behavior. Does that mean then that if a person can change his behavior he could become well? Not exactly. Someone suffering from bipolar does need to learn to modify her behavior, but until she gets her mania and depression under control with medication, we will see little or no change in her behavior. This is why doctors recommend a combination of medication and therapy or counseling.

Many times, a hospital stay is inadequate to make a significant impact on a person’s performance. Continued counseling or coaching is needed to help the person benefit fully from treatment. In my practice, I can help you make those lifestyle changes that will help you deal with depression, anxiety and stress.

In this month of May, the emphasis is on mental health. If you have been struggling with the disorders mentioned above for a long time, now is the time to take control. Fill out the form below and arrange for a free consultation. I will be happy to hear from you.