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3 Reasons To Keep Your Doctor Appointments

Some people do not like to keep their doctor appointments. They either see them as an encroachment on their time or they fear the doctor may give them a bad report. However, keeping your appointments and following your doctor’s orders can prevent you from getting a bad report. This post looks at the benefits to be derived from keeping your doctor appointments.

  1. Keeping your doctor appointments is key to diagnosing diabetes while it is still in the early stages. A simple blood test will reveal whether you are developing prediabetes, diabetes, heart disease or some other chronic condition. If your A1C level is 5. 7% to 6 . 4% you are at the prediabetes level; if it’s 6. 5% or higher, you have diabetes. A normal A1C is less than 5 . 7%. It’s much better to discover something is wrong during your annual visit than to wait until you are so sick that you have to be taken to the emergency room.
  2. Your annual wellness visit also gives you the opportunity to discuss with your doctor any changes in your symptoms. Type 2 diabetes can lead to other chronic illnesses such as kidney disease, eye disease, a weakened immune system, or an infection. This may be the time for your doctor to refer you to any specialists depending on your report and his findings. A nutritionist can help with your diet, which can go a long way in controlling your diabetes.
  3. Are you happy with your medications? Are they working as you would like them to? Are you experiencing side effects? These are some questions your doctor may ask during your annual wellness visit. You may be taking your medications as prescribed and still have glucose levels that are too high. Also, if you have concerns about sticking your finger to monitor your sugar, you may want to ask your doctor about how you can get a continuous glucose monitor (CGM).

CGMs test blood sugar levels and send out an alarm when your sugar is high. If you have trouble reaching and maintaining your target blood sugar you may benefit from a CGM. However, bear in mind that if you are managing your diabetes well without a CGM, your insurance may not cover it—they might consider it a non-necessity.

Diabetes is a serious illness that can affect your kidneys, your eyes and other organs, and even lead to amputations, therefore, you owe it to yourself to keep those doctor appointments so your doctor can ensure that you are managing your illness in the best way possible. It’s fine to take your medications, and make healthy lifestyle changes, but in the final analysis, you need to remain under the watchful eyes of your doctor and your healthcare team so they can spot problems as soon as they occur and deal with them.

A diagnosis of type 2 diabetes can send your life into a tailspin. It can leave you feeling alone and overwhelmed, but it doesn’t have to. Join my type 2 diabetes network group and get the help and support you need.

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Can Chaotic Blood Sugar Cause Mood Swings?

Do you find yourself becoming irritable, angry, or depressed for no apparent reason? This may happen to a lot of people suffering from diabetes and they may not realize that their chaotic blood sugar might be causing their mood swings.

By chaotic blood sugar we mean blood sugar readings that are high one minute and low the next, and as your blood sugar fluctuates, so do your moods.

Managing diabetes can be difficult. You may become so overwhelmed by the new demands put on your body that you may even wonder if you have a mental health problem. It may help to know that studies have found that there is a relationship between mood swings and chaotic blood sugar.

Mood swings from high and low blood sugar

The School of Public Health University of Michigan states that high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) have been known to cause anger or sadness, while low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) has been known to result in nervousness.

Mood swings in people who are not diabetic

The report goes on to state that people who are not diabetic can also experience mood swings. This can happen through consuming a diet high in refined sugars and carbs. This can cause a sudden rush of blood sugar, followed by an increase in insulin into the blood, leading to hypoglycemia.

3 tips to manage your blood sugar

  • Reduce stress. Stress affects your hormones, which can put your blood sugar on a roller coaster. Talk to the people around you about how you feel and do not be ashamed to ask for help in managing your diabetes.
  • Increase your protein and fiber intake. Protein foods (meat, fish, beans, lentils) have a low glycemic load and therefore will not impact your glucose level. Foods rich in fiber —fruits and green, leafy vegetables—are also low in sugar and will not raise your sugar level.
  • Cut down on sugary drinks —sodas, juices with sugar added—and refined carbohydrates —cakes, cookies, muffins, and pastries, to name a few. These have a high glycemic index and can make it difficult to manage your diabetes.

It’s important to listen to your body. Chaotic blood sugar can make managing your diabetes more difficult. Most diabetics say they can tell when their blood sugar is high or when it is low without using their glucometer. If you find yourself becoming overwhelmed or unable to cope, speak to your health care provider or your health coach and get the help you need.

To learn more about how you can manage your diabetes, sign up for the newsletter below.

A diagnosis of type 2 diabetes can send your life into a tailspin. It can leave you feeling alone and overwhelmed, but it doesn’t have to. Join my type 2 diabetes network group and get the help and support you need.

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Mid-week Study: Can Debt Give You Diabetes?

It’s no secret that being in debt can cause you to worry and worry leads to stress, which can lead to illness. But now a study undertaken by the Urban Institute found a significant increase in the number of Americans over age 55 who are in debt.

Image by granderboy from Pixabay

Becoming ill because of debt

Even more troubling, the study found that those who are burdened by debt are more likely to be diagnosed with cancer, hypertension, heart disease, and diabetes. Also, these same people were found to have difficulty in handling everyday activities. Having unsecured debt such as credit card debt, student loans and medical bills can be more detrimental than home loans.

Unable to afford insulin

You might say, well, I try my best to avoid credit card debt, but in some cases, it may be unavoidable. A survey commissioned by CharityRx showed that 4 in 5 adults who have diabetes or care for someone with the disease have credit card debt averaging $9,000 for insulin alone. Seventy-nine percent of the people surveyed said they struggle financially because of insulin cost and 62% said they either skip or adjust their insulin doses to stretch the supply and save money.

Why is insulin so expensive in the US?

Recently, the president of the US Joe Biden came on national television to talk about the high cost of insulin, a drug that is critical to managing diabetes in millions of people. Since he spoke, I don’t know if anything has been done, so I decided to research why insulin is so expensive in the US, supposedly the richest country in the world.

What is insulin made of

In an article posted by NPR, a doctor discovered that the older version of insulin that had gone through a lot of changes and that was successfully treating a lot of diabetics, suddenly disappeared around the 1970s. The newer version contains the human gene for insulin, whereas the older version was made from insulin taken from the pancreas of cattle.

So, the older version disappeared and the newer version now costs the consumer around $400 a month. However, you can still get the older version for $35 in Canada. If you are among the millions who depend on insulin you may be wondering if the drug will ever be sold at a price that is affordable. According to NPR, some experts believe that as the older insulin patents expire and the FDA allows similar versions onto the market, costs will decrease.

Whether this happens or not, you owe it to yourself to pay attention to your diet, your physical activity, and your stress level. And as always, before following any advice in this blog, please do your own research and consult your physician.

A diagnosis of type 2 diabetes can send your life into a tailspin. It can leave you feeling alone and overwhelmed, but it doesn’t have to. Join my type 2 diabetes network group and get the help and support you need.

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What You Should Know About Your A1C

If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you may be familiar with the term A1C. It is the result of your average blood sugar for the past two or three months. The test, which is done for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, is sometimes called the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1C.

Why is the test done?

Your doctor usually orders this test at least twice a year to monitor how well your treatment is working. The higher your A1C, the greater your risk of developing diabetes complications. If you are not meeting your treatment goals, or you change treatment, you may need to have the test more often. The A1C test is also done to diagnose diabetes.

What do the numbers mean?

An A1C level below 5.7% is considered normal. Between 5.7% to 6.4% indicates prediabetes, and anything higher than 6.5% is diabetes. Within the prediabetes range—5.7% to 6.4%—the higher your measurement, the greater your chance of developing diabetes.

Your A1C may also be reported as eAG or ‘estimated average glucose.’ eAG is similar to the reading you get when you check your blood sugar at home on your meter. The ADA has given a comparison of what the readings may look like. For example, if you get a reading of 140, your eAG may be 7.8. A reading of 154 on your meter is 8.6. The ADA also states since you check your sugar in the morning or before meals, your meter readings will be lower than your eAG.

Since we are talking numbers, a normal glucose reading for an adult is between 90 to 110 mg/dl.

What number should I aim at?

The goal for most adults with diabetes is an A1C that is below 7%. However, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), “there’s no one-size-fits-all target.” A1C target levels can vary by each person’s age and other factors, and your target may be different from someone else’s.  

Managing your diabetes can be challenging. By following these helpful hints as well as your doctor’s advice, and making the necessary lifestyle changes, you can be well on your way to not only controlling diabetes but reversing it.

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